How to Implement Real-Time Updates With the WordPress Heartbeat API?

20 minutes read

To implement real-time updates with the WordPress Heartbeat API, you can follow these steps:

  1. Understand the WordPress Heartbeat API: The Heartbeat API is a built-in feature of WordPress that allows real-time communication between a user's browser and the server. It enables features like autosave, post locking, and real-time update notifications.
  2. Choose the suitable location: Decide where you want to implement real-time updates. It can be on the front end for user interactions or in the WordPress admin dashboard.
  3. Hook into the API: To use the Heartbeat API, you need to register your JavaScript code with it using the appropriate hooks. WordPress provides hooks like 'heartbeat-send', 'heartbeat-tick', and 'heartbeat-received'.
  4. Define your JavaScript actions: Determine what actions you want to perform when a real-time update is triggered. This could be updating a particular section of your website or displaying a notification.
  5. Create JavaScript handlers: Write JavaScript functions that handle your defined actions when Heartbeat API events occur. These functions will be registered with the Heartbeat API using the hooks mentioned in step 3.
  6. Use jQuery to make AJAX calls: With the help of jQuery, you can make AJAX calls to the server to retrieve updated data. This data can then be processed and used to update the desired elements on the page.
  7. Work with heartbeat-send: Use the 'heartbeat-send' hook to send information from the client browser to the server. You can include data such as the current screen, user's actions, or any other relevant information.
  8. Work with heartbeat-tick: The 'heartbeat-tick' hook runs on every heartbeat interval defined by WordPress. Here, you can check for any updates on the server and trigger the necessary actions in your JavaScript handlers.
  9. Work with heartbeat-received: The 'heartbeat-received' hook can be used to process any data sent back from the server during the AJAX call. You can update the UI based on this data.
  10. Debug and optimize: Test your implementation thoroughly to ensure that real-time updates are working as expected. Monitor server performance to identify and optimize any performance issues.


Remember to review the WordPress Heartbeat API documentation for more detailed information on each step.

Best WordPress Books of January 2024

1
WordPress: The Missing Manual: The Book That Should Have Been in the Box

Rating is 5 out of 5

WordPress: The Missing Manual: The Book That Should Have Been in the Box

2
WordPress All-in-One For Dummies

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

WordPress All-in-One For Dummies

3
Professional WordPress: Design and Development

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Professional WordPress: Design and Development

  • Wrox Press
4
WordPress Plugin Development Cookbook: Create powerful plugins to extend the world's most popular CMS, 2nd Edition

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

WordPress Plugin Development Cookbook: Create powerful plugins to extend the world's most popular CMS, 2nd Edition

5
Wordpress for Beginners: 3 Books in 1- A Comprehensive Beginners Guide+ Tips and Tricks+ Simple, Effective and Advanced Strategies to Build a Beautiful WordPress Website

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

Wordpress for Beginners: 3 Books in 1- A Comprehensive Beginners Guide+ Tips and Tricks+ Simple, Effective and Advanced Strategies to Build a Beautiful WordPress Website

6
WordPress 5 Cookbook: Actionable solutions to common problems when building websites with WordPress

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

WordPress 5 Cookbook: Actionable solutions to common problems when building websites with WordPress

7
WordPress in easy steps

Rating is 4.4 out of 5

WordPress in easy steps

8
WordPress 5 Complete: Build beautiful and feature-rich websites from scratch, 7th Edition

Rating is 4.3 out of 5

WordPress 5 Complete: Build beautiful and feature-rich websites from scratch, 7th Edition

9
Building Web Apps with WordPress: WordPress as an Application Framework

Rating is 4.2 out of 5

Building Web Apps with WordPress: WordPress as an Application Framework

10
1-Hour WordPress 2021: A visual step-by-step guide to building WordPress websites in one hour or less!

Rating is 4.1 out of 5

1-Hour WordPress 2021: A visual step-by-step guide to building WordPress websites in one hour or less!

11
Professional WordPress Plugin Development, 2nd Edition

Rating is 4 out of 5

Professional WordPress Plugin Development, 2nd Edition

12
WordPress For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))

Rating is 3.9 out of 5

WordPress For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))


How to change the frequency of Heartbeat API requests?

To change the frequency of Heartbeat API requests, follow these steps:

  1. Determine the current frequency: Check the frequency at which the Heartbeat API requests are being made. This can usually be found in the code where the Heartbeat API is implemented.
  2. Adjust the frequency: Depending on your requirements, you can increase or decrease the frequency of the Heartbeat API requests. Consider factors like server load, network bandwidth, and user experience while determining the new frequency.
  3. Update the code: Once you have decided on the new frequency, locate the code where the Heartbeat API requests are initiated. It is generally a JavaScript code snippet attached to an event listener or a timer.
  4. Modify the code: Adjust the code to reflect the desired frequency. You may need to change the time intervals or adjust the event triggers accordingly. For example, if you want to reduce the frequency of requests from every 10 seconds to every 30 seconds, update the code accordingly.
  5. Test and deploy: After modifying the code, test the changes thoroughly to ensure proper functionality. Check for any adverse effects on server performance or user experience. Once you are confident that the changes are working as intended, deploy the modified code to your production environment.


Remember to strike a balance between the frequency of Heartbeat API requests and the desired functionality. Higher frequency may provide more real-time updates but may impact server performance, while lower frequency may reduce server load but result in delayed updates.


How to enable real-time updates with the WordPress Heartbeat API?

To enable real-time updates with the WordPress Heartbeat API, follow these steps:

  1. Understand the Heartbeat API: The WordPress Heartbeat API uses AJAX calls to communicate between the web browser and the server to provide real-time updates. It is used by various WordPress features and plugins.
  2. Determine the frequency: Decide how frequently you want the Heartbeat API to send requests. By default, it is set to every 15 seconds for the post editor and every minute for the dashboard.
  3. Install a plugin: To control the Heartbeat API, you can use a plugin like Heartbeat Control. Install and activate the plugin from the WordPress plugin directory.
  4. Configure the plugin: After activation, navigate to "Settings" > "Heartbeat Control" in the WordPress dashboard. You will find various options to control the Heartbeat API.
  5. Adjust the settings: In the plugin settings, you can define the frequency of Heartbeat API requests. You can choose between disabling it completely, reducing the frequency, or leaving it as is. Make sure to consider the impact on server resources if you choose to increase the frequency.
  6. Specify locations: The plugin also allows you to specify the locations where the Heartbeat API should be active. For example, you can limit it to specific post types or the dashboard only.
  7. Save your settings: Once you have adjusted the settings, click on the "Save Changes" button to apply them.


By following these steps, you can enable and control real-time updates with the WordPress Heartbeat API according to your needs.


How to check if the Heartbeat API is enabled on my WordPress site?

To check if the Heartbeat API is enabled on your WordPress site, you can follow these steps:

  1. Log in to your WordPress admin dashboard.
  2. Go to the "Plugins" menu.
  3. Click on "Installed Plugins."
  4. Look for a plugin called "Heartbeat Control" or similar. If you have this plugin installed, the Heartbeat API is likely enabled. You can check the plugin settings to see how it is configured.
  5. If you don't have a specific plugin for Heartbeat Control, you can check the Heartbeat API status using the "Query Monitor" plugin: a. Install and activate the "Query Monitor" plugin from the Plugins menu. b. Go to the "Query Monitor" settings under the "Tools" menu. c. Click on the "Heartbeat" tab. d. Here you can see the status of the Heartbeat API and its usage on your site.


By following these steps, you should be able to determine whether the Heartbeat API is enabled on your WordPress site.

Best WordPress Hosting Providers in January 2024

1
Vultr

Rating is 5 out of 5

Vultr

  • Ultra-fast Intel Core
  • Low Price and High Quality
  • High Performance and Cheap Cloud Dedicated Servers
2
Digital Ocean

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Digital Ocean

  • Active Digital Community
  • Simple To Use
  • Starting as low as 5$ per month
3
AWS

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

AWS

4
Cloudways

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Cloudways


What steps should be taken if the Heartbeat API is causing high CPU usage?

If the Heartbeat API is causing high CPU usage, you can take the following steps to resolve the issue:

  1. Identify the cause: Determine if the Heartbeat API is indeed the cause of the high CPU usage. You can use tools like the Query Monitor plugin or the developer console in your browser to identify which scripts or requests are consuming the most resources.
  2. Evaluate the plugins: Check if any plugins or themes on your website are using the Heartbeat API excessively. Some plugins may use it for real-time notifications or other features that might result in constant requests to the server, leading to high CPU usage.
  3. Disable Heartbeat API: If you find that the Heartbeat API is indeed causing the issue, you can disable it or reduce its frequency. Several plugins are available for managing the Heartbeat API, such as Heartbeat Control or WP Disable, which allow you to adjust its interval or completely disable it. However, disabling it entirely may affect certain functionality, so it's recommended to find a balance.
  4. Optimize plugins and themes: Review the plugins and themes installed on your website. Disable any unnecessary plugins and consider replacing resource-intensive ones with more efficient alternatives. Likewise, ensure that your theme is well-optimized for performance.
  5. Use caching: Implement a caching solution on your website. Caching plugins like WP Super Cache or W3 Total Cache can help in reducing the server load by serving static versions of your pages instead of generating them dynamically for each request.
  6. Upgrade hosting resources: If you've followed the above steps but still experience high CPU usage due to Heartbeat API or other factors, consider upgrading your hosting plan or contacting your hosting provider. Higher resource allocations can help manage increased traffic and CPU usage.
  7. Consult an expert: If the issue persists or if you're not comfortable making changes to your website's configuration, it's advisable to consult a WordPress expert or seek support from the plugin/theme developers. They can provide you with more specific guidance and solutions tailored to your setup.


Remember to backup your website and test any modifications or changes on a staging site before implementing them on your live website.


How to exclude specific user roles from Heartbeat API requests?

To exclude specific user roles from Heartbeat API requests, you can use the heartbeat_received and heartbeat_settings filters in WordPress. Here's an example code snippet that demonstrates how to exclude specific user roles:

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
// Exclude specific user roles from Heartbeat API requests
function exclude_roles_from_heartbeat( $settings ) {
    // Get the current user
    $current_user = wp_get_current_user();
  
    // Define the roles to be excluded
    $excluded_roles = array( 'editor', 'subscriber' );
  
    // Check if the current user role is in excluded roles
    if ( array_intersect( $current_user->roles, $excluded_roles ) ) {
        $settings['interval'] = 0; // Set the interval to 0 for excluded roles
    }
  
    return $settings;
}
add_filter( 'heartbeat_settings', 'exclude_roles_from_heartbeat' );

// Disable Heartbeat API completely for specific user roles
function disable_heartbeat_for_roles( $response, $data ) {
    // Get the current user
    $current_user = wp_get_current_user();

    // Define the roles to be excluded
    $excluded_roles = array( 'editor', 'subscriber' );

    // Check if the current user role is in excluded roles
    if ( array_intersect( $current_user->roles, $excluded_roles ) ) {
        $response['wp-heartbeat'] = false; // Disable the Heartbeat API for excluded roles
    }

    return $response;
}
add_filter( 'heartbeat_received', 'disable_heartbeat_for_roles', 10, 2 );


This code snippet checks the role of the current user and then adjusts the Heartbeat API settings accordingly. For the excluded roles, it sets the Heartbeat interval to 0, effectively disabling the Heartbeat API for those roles.


How to monitor Heartbeat API activity in the browser console?

To monitor Heartbeat API activity in the browser console, you can follow these steps:

  1. Open your web browser (e.g., Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox).
  2. Navigate to the webpage where the Heartbeat API is being used.
  3. Right-click on the webpage and select "Inspect" or "Inspect Element" from the context menu. This will open the browser's developer console.
  4. Look for the "Network" tab in the developer console and click on it. This tab displays the network activity of the webpage.
  5. Make sure that the developer console is configured to preserve log, which means it will not clear the logs when you navigate to another page. You can usually find this option by right-clicking on the console area or through the console settings.
  6. Trigger a Heartbeat API request by performing the desired action on the webpage. This can be clicking a button, submitting a form, or any other event that triggers the API.
  7. As soon as the Heartbeat API request is triggered, you should see the corresponding network activity in the developer console. Look for the request related to the Heartbeat API, it may appear as "heartbeat" or have a specific URL or endpoint associated with it.
  8. Click on the request to view the detailed information such as the request headers, response data, and timing.
  9. You can also monitor real-time Heartbeat API activity by clicking on the "WS" (WebSocket) or "EventSource" tabs in the developer console if the Heartbeat API uses WebSocket or Server-Sent Events for communication.


Note: The actual process may slightly vary depending on the web browser you are using, but the general steps should be similar.


What is the role of Heartbeat API in the WordPress dashboard?

The Heartbeat API in the WordPress dashboard is responsible for sending requests between the user's browser and the server to keep the connection alive. This allows real-time data synchronization and other dynamic features to occur without the need to refresh the page constantly. The API is used by various components in the WordPress dashboard, such as autosave, post locking, notification of other users' activities, and more. It helps enhance the user experience by providing instant updates and reducing the chances of conflicts when multiple users are working on the same content simultaneously.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Whatsapp Pocket

Related Posts:

Do you know that WordPress comes with automated updates enabled for minor releases? Which means that the WordPress.org workforce can routinely set up safety updates with out requiring consumer enter. Nevertheless, it doesn’t routinely replace your web site wh...
To search for products using the Shopify API, you can follow these steps:Authenticate with the Shopify API by obtaining an API key and secret key from your Shopify store's admin settings.Make a GET request to the endpoint GET /admin/api/2021-07/products.js...
To implement custom REST API endpoints in WordPress, you need to follow these steps:Register a new custom endpoint: You can use the register_rest_route function to register a new endpoint. This function defines the endpoint URL, the HTTP methods it accepts, an...
To generate an API key in WooCommerce, follow these steps:Log in to your WooCommerce admin panel.Go to the "WooCommerce" tab in the WordPress dashboard, and click on "Settings."In the settings page, click on the "Advanced" tab and then ...
To access the Google Analytics API, you can follow the steps below:Create a Google Account: If you don't already have a Google Account, go to accounts.google.com and sign up for one. Enable the Google Analytics API: Visit the Google Cloud Console (console....
The Block Editor is Now Supported on the WordPress Native Apps The block editor permits for a smoother drafting expertise – now attainable on any display measurement. A part of what helps WordPress energy 35% of the net is language: WordPress is absolutely tra...