How to Create A Custom Admin Dashboard Widget In WordPress?

20 minutes read

To create a custom admin dashboard widget in WordPress, you need to follow these steps:

  1. Access the functions.php file: Open your WordPress theme folder and find the functions.php file.
  2. Add a function: Inside the functions.php file, add a new function that will create your custom dashboard widget. You can give it any name you prefer, such as 'custom_dashboard_widget'.
  3. Register the dashboard widget: Within the function, use the wp_add_dashboard_widget() function to register your custom widget. This function takes parameters such as a widget ID, title, callback function, and optional control callback function.
  4. Create the output callback function: Declare a new function that will output the content for your custom widget. You can name it as 'custom_dashboard_widget_content'. This function will contain the HTML and logic needed to display the widget content.
  5. Hook everything together: Finally, you need to hook your dashboard widget into the WordPress admin dashboard. Use the wp_dashboard_setup action hook to call your custom_dashboard_widget function. This function will be triggered when the dashboard is being set up.


With these steps, you have successfully created a custom admin dashboard widget in WordPress. You can now style and customize the dashboard widget to your liking by modifying the output callback function.

Best WordPress Books of July 2024

1
WordPress: The Missing Manual: The Book That Should Have Been in the Box

Rating is 5 out of 5

WordPress: The Missing Manual: The Book That Should Have Been in the Box

2
WordPress All-in-One For Dummies

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

WordPress All-in-One For Dummies

3
Professional WordPress: Design and Development

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Professional WordPress: Design and Development

  • Wrox Press
4
WordPress Plugin Development Cookbook: Create powerful plugins to extend the world's most popular CMS, 2nd Edition

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

WordPress Plugin Development Cookbook: Create powerful plugins to extend the world's most popular CMS, 2nd Edition

5
Wordpress for Beginners: 3 Books in 1- A Comprehensive Beginners Guide+ Tips and Tricks+ Simple, Effective and Advanced Strategies to Build a Beautiful WordPress Website

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

Wordpress for Beginners: 3 Books in 1- A Comprehensive Beginners Guide+ Tips and Tricks+ Simple, Effective and Advanced Strategies to Build a Beautiful WordPress Website

6
WordPress 5 Cookbook: Actionable solutions to common problems when building websites with WordPress

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

WordPress 5 Cookbook: Actionable solutions to common problems when building websites with WordPress

7
WordPress in easy steps

Rating is 4.4 out of 5

WordPress in easy steps

8
WordPress 5 Complete: Build beautiful and feature-rich websites from scratch, 7th Edition

Rating is 4.3 out of 5

WordPress 5 Complete: Build beautiful and feature-rich websites from scratch, 7th Edition

9
Building Web Apps with WordPress: WordPress as an Application Framework

Rating is 4.2 out of 5

Building Web Apps with WordPress: WordPress as an Application Framework

10
1-Hour WordPress 2021: A visual step-by-step guide to building WordPress websites in one hour or less!

Rating is 4.1 out of 5

1-Hour WordPress 2021: A visual step-by-step guide to building WordPress websites in one hour or less!

11
Professional WordPress Plugin Development, 2nd Edition

Rating is 4 out of 5

Professional WordPress Plugin Development, 2nd Edition

12
WordPress For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))

Rating is 3.9 out of 5

WordPress For Dummies (For Dummies (Computer/Tech))


What is the procedure to create a custom widget that shows user statistics in the admin dashboard?

To create a custom widget that shows user statistics in the admin dashboard, you can follow these steps:

  1. Create a new WordPress plugin or open an existing one.
  2. Open your plugin file and enqueue necessary scripts and stylesheets.
1
2
3
4
5
function enqueue_admin_scripts() {
    wp_enqueue_script( 'my-widget-script', plugin_dir_url( __FILE__ ) . '/js/my-widget-script.js', array( 'jquery' ), '1.0', true );
    wp_enqueue_style( 'my-widget-style', plugin_dir_url( __FILE__ ) . '/css/my-widget-style.css' );
}
add_action( 'admin_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_admin_scripts' );


  1. Create a new PHP class for your widget, extending the WP_Widget class.
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
class UserStatisticsWidget extends WP_Widget {

    function __construct() {
        parent::__construct(
            'user_statistics_widget',
            __('User Statistics Widget', 'text_domain'),
            array( 'description' => __('Display user statistics in the admin dashboard', 'text_domain'), )
        );
    }

    public function widget( $args, $instance ) {
        echo $args['before_widget'];
        echo $args['before_title'] . __('User Statistics', 'text_domain') . $args['after_title'];
        echo '<div class="user-statistics-widget">' . __('Your statistics content here', 'text_domain') . '</div>';
        echo $args['after_widget'];
    }
  
    public function form( $instance ) {
        // Widget admin form - customization options
    }

    public function update( $new_instance, $old_instance ) {
        // Save widget settings
    }

}


  1. Register your custom widget by calling the register_widget function.
1
2
3
4
function register_user_statistics_widget() {
    register_widget( 'UserStatisticsWidget' );
}
add_action( 'widgets_init', 'register_user_statistics_widget' );


  1. Customize the widget method to display the actual user statistics data. You can retrieve user statistics using WordPress functions or access your own custom data tables.
  2. Customize the form method to define any customization options for the widget in the admin dashboard.
  3. Customize the update method to handle and save any changes made to the widget options.
  4. Style your widget using the enqueued stylesheet my-widget-style.css and create a Javascript file my-widget-script.js, if needed, for any dynamic functionality.
  5. Install and activate your plugin.


Once you complete these steps, your custom user statistics widget will be available in the WordPress admin dashboard to add to any widget area.


How to display dynamic data in a custom admin dashboard widget?

To display dynamic data in a custom admin dashboard widget, you can follow these steps:

  1. Register a new dashboard widget using the wp_dashboard_setup action hook. This hook will be triggered when the dashboard is being set up.
1
2
3
4
5
add_action('wp_dashboard_setup', 'custom_dashboard_widget');

function custom_dashboard_widget() {
    wp_add_dashboard_widget('custom_dashboard_widget', 'Custom Widget', 'custom_widget_callback');
}


  1. Define a callback function for the widget content. This function will be responsible for fetching and displaying the dynamic data.
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
function custom_widget_callback() {
    // Fetch your dynamic data here
    $dynamic_data = get_dynamic_data();

    // Display the dynamic data
    echo '<ul>';
    foreach ($dynamic_data as $data) {
        echo '<li>' . $data . '</li>';
    }
    echo '</ul>';
}


  1. Write a function to fetch the dynamic data from your desired source, such as a database or an API.
1
2
3
4
5
6
function get_dynamic_data() {
    // Fetch the data from your source here
    $data = [ /* your data here */ ];

    return $data;
}


  1. Lastly, enqueue any necessary scripts or stylesheets using the admin_enqueue_scripts action hook. This will ensure any required assets are loaded for your widget.
1
2
3
4
5
6
add_action('admin_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_custom_widget_assets');

function enqueue_custom_widget_assets() {
    wp_enqueue_style('custom_widget_styles', 'path/to/your/styles.css');
    wp_enqueue_script('custom_widget_script', 'path/to/your/script.js');
}


With these steps, you can create a custom admin dashboard widget that displays dynamic data. Adapt the code to your specific data source and formatting requirements.


How to create a responsive admin dashboard widget in WordPress?

To create a responsive admin dashboard widget in WordPress, follow these steps:

  1. Register the widget - Open your theme's functions.php file and add the following code to register the widget:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
function custom_dashboard_widget() {
    wp_add_dashboard_widget(
        'custom_dashboard_widget',
        'Custom Dashboard Widget',
        'custom_dashboard_widget_content'
    );
}
add_action('wp_dashboard_setup', 'custom_dashboard_widget');


  1. Create the widget content - In the same functions.php file, add a callback function named custom_dashboard_widget_content to output the content of the widget:
1
2
3
4
function custom_dashboard_widget_content() {
    // Widget content HTML goes here
    echo '<p>Hello, this is a custom admin dashboard widget!</p>';
}


  1. Make the widget responsive - To make the widget responsive, you need to enqueue a CSS file that adds responsive styles. Create a new CSS file named admin-widget.css and add your responsive styles:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
/* Example responsive styles */
@media (max-width: 768px) {
    /* Styles for screens with a maximum width of 768px */
    .dashboard-widgets-wrap .custom_dashboard_widget_content {
        font-size: 14px;
    }
}


  1. Enqueue the CSS file - In your functions.php file, enqueue the CSS file by adding the following code:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
function enqueue_admin_widget_styles() {
    wp_enqueue_style(
        'admin-widget-styles',
        get_template_directory_uri() . '/admin-widget.css'
    );
}
add_action('admin_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_admin_widget_styles');


  1. Save the changes and upload the theme folder to your WordPress site.


Now, when you go to the admin dashboard, you should see your custom widget named "Custom Dashboard Widget" with the content you specified in the custom_dashboard_widget_content function. The widget will also be responsive according to the styles defined in the admin-widget.css file.

Best WordPress Hosting Providers in July 2024

1
Vultr

Rating is 5 out of 5

Vultr

  • Ultra-fast Intel Core
  • Low Price and High Quality
  • High Performance and Cheap Cloud Dedicated Servers
2
Digital Ocean

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Digital Ocean

  • Active Digital Community
  • Simple To Use
  • Starting as low as 5$ per month
3
AWS

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

AWS

4
Cloudways

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Cloudways


How to back up and restore a custom admin dashboard widget configuration?

To back up and restore a custom admin dashboard widget configuration, you can follow these steps:


Back up the widget configuration:

  1. Access the WordPress files and navigate to the theme or plugin folder where the custom widget is located.
  2. Locate the PHP file that contains the code for registering and configuring the widget.
  3. Open the PHP file in a text editor.
  4. In the file, find the function responsible for registering and configuring the widget.
  5. Copy the entire code block related to the widget, including the widget registration and configuration code.
  6. Paste the copied code into a separate text file and save it. This file will serve as your backup.


Restore the widget configuration:

  1. Access the WordPress files and locate the theme or plugin folder where the custom widget should be restored.
  2. Open the PHP file that contains the code for registering and configuring the widget in a text editor.
  3. If the file doesn't already exist, create a new one.
  4. Paste the backed-up widget configuration code into the PHP file.
  5. Save the file.
  6. Go to your WordPress admin dashboard and navigate to the "Appearance" -> "Widgets" section.
  7. Check if the custom widget has been restored and adjust its settings if needed.


Note: It's recommended to create a backup of your website, including its files and database, before making any changes to ensure you can roll back if anything goes wrong.


What is an admin dashboard widget in WordPress?

In WordPress, an admin dashboard widget is a small module or box that is displayed on the backend or admin area of a WordPress website. These widgets provide quick access to important information or functionality, allowing site administrators to easily manage and monitor different aspects of the website.


Admin dashboard widgets can vary in their purpose and functionality. Some common examples include:

  1. Site Stats: These widgets provide information about the number of posts, comments, and views on the website, giving administrators an overview of the site's performance.
  2. Quick Draft: This widget allows administrators to quickly create and publish a new draft post directly from the dashboard, without needing to navigate to the Posts page.
  3. Recent Comments: This widget displays a list of the most recent comments on the website, making it easy for administrators to moderate and respond to them.
  4. Activity: This widget shows a log of recent activities and updates on the website, such as new user registrations, post modifications, and plugin updates.
  5. Custom Widgets: WordPress also allows users to add custom dashboard widgets through plugins or custom code. These can provide specific information or functionality tailored to the needs of the website.


Overall, admin dashboard widgets are designed to enhance the user experience for site administrators by providing easy access to essential information and tools.


How to add pagination to a custom admin dashboard widget?

To add pagination to a custom admin dashboard widget, you can follow these steps:

  1. Register a callback function to display the content of your custom widget. You can use the wp_add_dashboard_widget() function to register the widget. function my_custom_widget_callback() { // Widget content goes here } wp_add_dashboard_widget( 'my_custom_widget', 'My Custom Widget', 'my_custom_widget_callback' );
  2. Retrieve and prepare the data to be displayed in your widget. This might involve querying a custom post type, fetching data from a database, or performing any other necessary operations. function my_custom_widget_callback() { // Retrieve data for pagination $args = array( 'post_type' => 'my_custom_post_type', 'posts_per_page' => 10, 'paged' => isset( $_GET['paged'] ) ? intval( $_GET['paged'] ) : 1, ); $query = new WP_Query( $args ); // Widget content goes here }
  3. Generate the pagination links using the paginate_links() function. You need to pass the total number of pages and the current page number to generate the correct links. function my_custom_widget_callback() { // Retrieve data for pagination $args = array( 'post_type' => 'my_custom_post_type', 'posts_per_page' => 10, 'paged' => isset( $_GET['paged'] ) ? intval( $_GET['paged'] ) : 1, ); $query = new WP_Query( $args ); // Prepare data for pagination $total_pages = $query->max_num_pages; $current_page = max( 1, get_query_var( 'paged' ) ); // Generate pagination links $pagination_links = paginate_links( array( 'base' => add_query_arg( 'paged', '%#%' ), 'format' => '', 'prev_text' => __( '«' ), 'next_text' => __( '»' ), 'total' => $total_pages, 'current' => $current_page, ) ); // Widget content goes here, including the pagination links }
  4. Finally, display the content of your widget, including the pagination links generated above. function my_custom_widget_callback() { // Retrieve data for pagination $args = array( 'post_type' => 'my_custom_post_type', 'posts_per_page' => 10, 'paged' => isset( $_GET['paged'] ) ? intval( $_GET['paged'] ) : 1, ); $query = new WP_Query( $args ); // Prepare data for pagination $total_pages = $query->max_num_pages; $current_page = max( 1, get_query_var( 'paged' ) ); // Generate pagination links $pagination_links = paginate_links( array( 'base' => add_query_arg( 'paged', '%#%' ), 'format' => '', 'prev_text' => __( '«' ), 'next_text' => __( '»' ), 'total' => $total_pages, 'current' => $current_page, ) ); // Display the widget content, including pagination links echo '
    '; // Display your widget content here echo '
      '; while ( $query->have_posts() ) { $query->the_post(); echo '
    • ' . get_the_title() . '
    • '; } echo '
    '; echo '
    '; // Display the pagination links echo '
    '; echo $pagination_links; echo '
    '; }


Make sure to replace my_custom_post_type with the relevant post type slug and customize the widget content and styles to fit your specific needs.


How to access the WordPress admin dashboard?

To access the WordPress admin dashboard, follow these steps:

  1. Open your preferred web browser.
  2. Enter your website's URL in the address bar (e.g., www.yourwebsite.com/wp-admin).
  3. Add "/wp-admin" at the end of the URL and press Enter.
  4. You will be redirected to the WordPress admin login page.
  5. Enter your username and password in the provided fields.
  6. Click on the "Log In" button.
  7. If your login credentials are correct, you will be taken to the WordPress admin dashboard, where you can manage your website's content, themes, plugins, and settings.
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Whatsapp Pocket

Related Posts:

To integrate a Facebook Like button in WordPress, you will need to follow these steps:Login to your WordPress dashboard.Navigate to the Appearance section and click on &#34;Widgets&#34;.Select the widget area where you want to add the Facebook Like button, suc...
To change a password in WordPress admin, follow these steps:Log in to your WordPress admin dashboard by visiting the wp-admin extension of your website (e.g., www.yourwebsite.com/wp-admin).Enter your username or email address associated with your admin account...
To check the WordPress version, you can follow these steps:Log in to the WordPress admin area by visiting the login URL (usually http://example.com/wp-admin).Enter your username and password to log in.Once logged in, you will be directed to the WordPress admin...
Are you searching for helpful WordPress widgets on your web site? Widgets assist you to add content material, options, and different components to your WordPress sidebar and different widget-ready areas. WordPress comes with a handful of built-in widgets tha...
To change a WordPress favicon, follow these steps:Choose or create a new favicon image: Start by selecting or creating a favicon image that represents your website. Ideally, the image should be in .ico format, although other formats like .png or .jpg can work ...
Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) is a popular WordPress plugin that allows you to add custom fields to your website, making it easier to manage and display content in a structured way. Here&#39;s a brief explanation of how to implement advanced custom fields with ...